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Election 2014: Key Races, Tea Party Candidates & The Odds of the GOP Retaking The Senate

Election 2014: Key Races, Tea Party Candidates & The Odds of the GOP Retaking The Senate

In order to retake control of the U.S. Senate, Republicans need to net a six-seat pickup. In the House, Democrats will have to net a gain of 17 seats in order to obtain majority control.

Seven key races in each chamber:

SENATE

•ALASKA: Tea Party candidate Joe Miller is expected to be one of three contenders for the Republican nomination to challenge Mark Begich, first-term Democratic incumbent. Other Republican candidates include Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell and Dan Sullivan, former head of the state’s natural resources department.

National Security Hangs in the Balance As The Pentagon Braces for Sequestration

 

 

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On Wednesday, the House passed the “No Budget, No Pay Bill” which will temporarily suspend the nation’s debt ceiling until May 19th. Included in the measure is a provision that would withhold congressional pay after April 15th and extend until Congress passes a budget. During a press conference, in the middle of the House vote, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said the Senate would take up the House measure “as is,” and the president is expected to sign it.

The Hill reports 33 Republicans voted against it because it didn’t include any spending cuts, but 86 Democrats voted for it with the final vote being 285-144.

Will GOP Leaders Become Bob Michelized?

The 1994 election provides a beacon of hope for Republicans in Congress.  Voters in the historical mid-term election gave control of the United States House of Representatives to the Republicans for the first time in 40 years.  The last time the Republicans gained control of the House was when Dwight David Eisenhower won his overwhelming victory over Adlai Stevenson in 1952.

Senate Republicans also regained control of the Senate from 1953 to 1955, just as the Republicans in the House did.  While House Republicans were in the political wilderness for the next 40 years, President Ronald Reagan’s two landslides in 1980 and 1984 gave Republicans control of the Senate for six years.

The reason the U.S. Congress was controlled by the Democrats for most of the 40 years prior to the 1994 election can best be personified by the long-time minority  --  emphasis on minority  --  leader, Congressman Bob Michel, a very kind and genial man, but a highly ineffective leader.  Congressman Michel was perfectly content to accept crumbs from the Democrat spending feast.  If the Democrats promised a cut of $1 dollar in federal spending for every $1 tax increase  --  a highly unlikely proposal since they normally wanted more tax increases --  you can bet the spending cuts would not materialize following the tax increases because of decades of weak Republican leadership.

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