Many analysts say Conyer's "Hate Crimes" bill doomed to fail

Last week, Congressman Barney Frank, liberal Democrat from Massachusetts, put out a press release saying that the so-called "Local Law Enforcement Hate Crimes Act of 2009," H.R. 1913, of which he is an original co-sponsor, is expected to pass the House Judiciary Committee, populated by a majority of left-wing Democrats.  Frank --  in his press release  --  said that H.R. 1913 will most likely be on the House floor for a vote later this spring.  The legislation was introduced into the House of Representatives on April 2 by the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Congressman John Conyers (D-MI.)
 
However, many political analysts say that it will not pass on the floor of the House of Representatives, because the 40 some Democrats who were elected in Republican districts  --  won both times by President George W. Bush and won by Senator John McCain last year  --  will be very queasy about voting for the so-called "hate crimes" bill.  The Employment Non-discrimination Act (ENDA) has a much better chance of passing Congress considering that in the past, a conservative Congressman like Paul Ryan, R-WI, voted for ENDA.
 
Christian Newswire reported that Dr. Gary Cass of the Christian Anti-Defamation Commission said about the so-called "hate crimes" bill:  "All freedom loving Americans must voice their opposition to this bill.  If this bill passes it lays the foundation for censoring Christians. In other countries, Like in Canada and Sweden, where these types of hate crime laws have been implemented, pastors and Christians have been jailed and fined for their faithful adherence to the biblical values."
 
Because of fears for their longevity by the 40 some "Blue Dog Democrats," it is unlikely that Barack Obama will have the opportunity to sign this bill into law, even though he has promised to do so if it reaches his desk.  And if, somehow, it manages to pass in the House of Representatives, most analysts believe a filibuster by a solid majority of Senate Republicans and a number of conservative Democrats would kill it in the United States Senate.

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